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Saturday, March 7, 2015

Science Says Entrepreneurs Should Believe in God

A recent scientific study suggests that belief in God produces a greater tolerance for positive risks.
By Geoffrey James, Contributor to inc.com
Through writing this column, I've learned a lot about how entrepreneurs think. They value courage, confidence and trying making the world a better place to live. I've also observed that many, and even most, entrepreneurs believe in God.
That's why I'm not entirely surprised that a scientific study conducted at Radboud University in the Netherlands strongly suggests that belief in God can make you a more effective entrepreneur.
The study measured the amount of risk that people are willing to take. It found that believers, due to their moral compass, were LESS likely to take self-destructive risks, like taking drugs.
At the same time, the study discovered that, due to their faith in God's protection, believers were MORE likely to take risks that could result in high rewards either emotionally or financially.
For example, believers are more likely to sky-dive than non-believers because their belief in God (and an afterlife) gives them additional confidence. Apparently the same effect applies to starting a business.
Multiple studies have already shown that entrepreneurs must be not just confident but overconfident or they wouldn't dare to start their own business. Apparently, belief that one's actions are part of God's plan is a good way to create strong self-confidence.
Furthermore, belief in God may increase the ability of an entrepreneur to create a community that works well together.
Some evolutionary biologists think that religions evolved as a human trait that made the survival of the group (and not just the individual) important.
While that might be true, it may be more useful to think of community building in terms of taking a series of positive risks. It's a risk to trust somebody to get a job done. Belief in God apparently helps entrepreneurs tolerate these personal risks be more willing to trust their colleagues and coworkers.
This is not to say it makes sense to become a believer simply in order to become a better leader. It's doubtful if that kind of "conversion" would provide enough belief to positively influence behavior.
However, the study does suggest that investors should consider belief in God as a positive indicator when evaluating a founder's potential to to succeed by taking positive, calculated risks.

With that in mind, perhaps the term "angel investor" should be treated as more than just a metaphor, eh?

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Understanding the 1-Dimentional, 2-Dimensional, 3-Dimensional and 4-Dimensional Spaces


Moving between  1D, 2D, 3D and 4D Dimensions


Friday, January 30, 2015

Reading Challenge

WE CHALLENGE YOU TO READ
the 58 page "HyperCube of Love" eBook that examines in great detail the 4-Dimension Space in the Bible, the Love of Christ. 37 color illustrations have been added to help you. 
It is a must read!

Click the eBook cover below to get it

 

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Turning Light Into Matter … And Raspberries


from KHouse
Mass = L/c2. Albert Einstein said so in 1905. A simple replacement of L (light energy) with the letter E (all energy), move “c2” to the other side of the equal sign, and we get “Ta da!” the familiar equation: mc2=E
Or, better yet: E = mc2
Thanks to Gary Larson, Bugs Bunny and elementary school, most people are aware of this bit of physics, and even that Einstein is to be blamed for it.
What does it mean? It means that Mass is ultimately equal to Energy, which was demonstrated in the detonation of the first nuclear bomb. It also theoretically means that Energy can be converted into Mass, but until recently physicists hadn’t been able to figure out how to it. We’re not only years away from a good old-fashioned Star Trek food synthesizer, we can’t even make protons from photons.
In 1934, Gregory Breit and John Wheeler played with the idea that matter could indeed be created from light by smashing together two photons. They might not be able to organize molecules into apples or pears, but the photon car-wreck could create an electron and a positron. It has been 82 years, and physicists at the Imperial College of London have finally put together plans for a “photo-photon collider” — a machine that could actually force two photons to crash into one another. Sort of.
It’s not as easy as you’d think. Photons belong to a class of subatomic particles known as bosons, and bosons are known for their peculiar ability to share the same quantum state. It’s like being able to be in the same place at the same time. In reality, Star Wars light sabers wouldn’t smash into each other, they’d “swish” pass right through one another like good light beams should. Fermions, particles like protons and electrons, aren’t so fortunate. They take up their own space and they don’t like to share it. It’s easy to smash together two particles that take up their own space. It’s not so easy to crash together two particles that can pass right through each other… like a light wave.
Photons do interact with charged particles like electrons and protons, though. Occasionally, a photon can waffle into a particle-antiparticle pair like an electron and positron, allowing one of the mates in this subatomic pair to capture another photon. A soon as the electron and positron recombine (Pow!), they release two photons. This all happens in fractions of a second, and it appears as though two photons just bounced off each other. This “photon-photon scattering” has been observed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland, but nobody’s been able to systematically force the interaction.
A research team led by Oliver Pike at the Imperial College of London has figured out a way to increase the number of photon-derived electron-positron teams that can interact with other particles. Their article in Nature Photonics proposes the building of a machine called the “photon-photon collider” which uses several steps, starting with accelerating electrons with a laser and pounding them into a bar of gold. This first step will create a beam of light immensely more intense than sunlight. The machine would aim this beam at a hohlraum, a hollow cave of gold, to create a thermal radiation field that releases another beam of light that will intersect with the first beam. The electrons and positrons formed during the interaction of the light beams would be detected as they left the hohlraum, and should produce far more pairs of particles than the occasional chance encounter made in the CERN LHC.
The design is out; now the researchers have to build the machine and test it.
“Although the theory is conceptually simple, it has been very difficult to verify experimentally,” Pike said. “We were able to develop the idea for the collider very quickly, but the experimental design we propose can be carried out with relative ease and with existing technology… The race to carry out and complete the experiment is on!”
It’s a massive challenge for physicists, but once they conquer it, their accomplishment will still come several years too late. Organic machines have long been capable of taking light energy and converting it into matter. In fact, these organic machine are capable of organizing molecules into the shapes of apples and pears and figs. These organic machines are called “trees” and they are in many respects similar to the organic machines called “raspberry bushes” that provide delicious materials for jams and ice cream topping.
You’d think that we could throw light, carbon and water together into some sort of food-like substance too, but there will be no vending machines producing foods that were “photo-synthesized” any time soon. As great as our technological advances have proved, manipulating subatomic particles is still the expertise of the Creator alone.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Lobotomy is not a prerequisite to faith.

QUOTE from Russ Pierson, Green­ Faith Fel­low

Lobotomy is not a prerequisite to faith. 

You should probe, poke, investigate this incredible universe (or multi-verse!) in which you find yourself. 

Consider the wisdom of science even as you consider the wisdom of Scripture. You should challenge God and challenge yourself. 

Explore the mysteries, hold things in tension, embrace paradox.

God is bigger than you think -- or God is not God at all.

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